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Re: indias pakistan troubles, reply to shekhar rao's mail



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From: Shekhar Rao <r.shekharrao@idbi.co.in>
To: <debate@indiapolicy.org>
Sent: Tuesday, September 18, 2001 10:33 AM
Subject: Re: indias pakistan troubles
>     only to remind Sudhir.  Some eye openers may be.
>
> 1.    Pak wins        they celebrate
> 2.    70-80% of the underworld are them
> 3.    News in Bihar or elsewhere of kidnapping and murder more than
> often
> involve their names
> 4.    No family planning for them.
> 5.    Their law is different from the law of land and they do not
agree
> to
> the constitutional law
> 6.    They do not say PLEDGE (India is My Country) in their schools
> 7.    They do not believe in singing National Anthem
>
>         WHY?
>
>         HAVE WE NOT CONSIDERED AND TREATED THEM AS INDIANS IN INDIA.
>
> Shekhar
Dear Shekhar and friends,
I think we need to examine these points dispassionately and learn
lessons
from history.
1. There could be many reasons why some people allegedly celebrate
India's
defeat or Pakistan's victory in cricket matches. But I am sure that if
at
all such celebrations happen, it must be a small fraction of the Muslim
community and obviously such generalisation for the whole muslims is
factually incorrect. But, even if we (by the expression 'we', I mean all

Indians irrespective of caste, creed or religion) give importance to
such
issues and attempt to analyse them, perhaps the first reason is that
they
have not been emotionally integrated into the so-called mainstream. If
they
notice a fair world where rule of law prevails, where justice is done
and
seen to be done irrespective of the prejudices of the person occupying
chair, where governance is accountable to the people, perhaps the
emotional
integration could set in. Another reason could be poor progress in
education
because of which ability to understand and analyse things gets hampered.

Third reason could be the sheer feeling of being a minority, by which a
person in the community shares a general feeling of insecurity, whenever
a
communal riot breaks out anywhere in the country. This feeling of being
a
minority occurs not only among muslims or christians, but among any
minority
anywhere in the world. For example, the Sikhs in USA now in the post-WTC

situation. This has happened to some Hindus living in North-East parts
of
India. Fourth reason could be rabid communal feeling, which could be
attributed to only a small fraction of any community. But the important
thing to note is that such rabid communal feeling can only be overcome
by
love. Communalism can only increase by counter-feelings of rabid
communalism
by other
communities.
2. Regarding 70 to 80% of underworld being our fellow countrymen
belonging
to a particular religion, what about rest of white collar criminals, who
may
never
be really brought to the book of law? The Harshad Mehtas, the Ketan
Parikhs,
the UTI scamsters and so many of them? What about so many scams ranging
from
Bofors to Urea Scam? What about so many anti-social elements in small
towns
in the whole of the country? Is it not a clear fact that there is no
monopoly of anybody for doing things against people of this country?
3. Bihar is a social melting point, where so many things based on
assertion
of caste identity are taking place. Religion does not figure anywhere in
the
social chaos prevailing in Bihar.
4. There is no compulsory family planning in India. The approach of the
government is only to place facts before people, encourage them for the
small family norm and leave it to their judgement. There was a time when

vasectomy was attempted forcibly in this country in 1975 if you
remember.
The family welfare apparatus is yet to recover from the very serious
backlash such overtures have generated. There are many studies which
have
shown that big family size in third world communities is a function of
poverty and lack of education of the girl child. Many traditional hindu
families were late to accept the idea. Naturally, it is not in the
conservative line of thinking where a child is considered as a gift of
God
to the family and to mankind. This happens in all conservative
communties
anywhere in the world. But things are changing by slow and gradual
process
of spread of awareness. The speed with which such change is brought
about in
a community is a function of education, income levels and emotional
integration of the community with the rest of the society. If we
concentrate
on reducing povety, enhancement of incomes, promoting better education
and
health facilities and continue the present policy of making it a pure
voluntary choice, perhaps the issue can be resolved. But if this issue
is
blown out of proportion and seen with a magnifying glass, naturally a
reaction is created.
5. I don't think there is much to the myth that they don't go by the
constitutional law. In fact, constitution of India gives everybody a
right
to profess, practise and propagate one's religion. It is you, Mr
Shekhar,
who is not going by the spirit of the Constitution, as Article 51 A (e)
enjoins upon every citizen of India the fundamental duty of "promoting
harmony and the spirit of common brotherhood amongst all the people of
India
transcending religious, linguistic and regional or sectional
diversities".
6 and 7. I have many of my friends and relations who had narrated the
pledge, sang the national anthem for years and left for USA in search of

greener pastures, leaving this society which has taken the pains of
educating them. Our society is  in serious disarray with problems of
poverty, illiteracy, lack of basic education, lack of primary health
facilities etc.. Of course some of them are helping their families.Some
of
them are also helping in charity work.  But, fact remains that in their
day
to day lives, they are cut off from this country and do not share much
of
this society. What use is singing national anthem when the spirit with
which
the song is sung does not get translated into action to prevent hunger
to
the vast masses of this country? Even if it is assumed for the sake of
argument that singing a song is important, is it better to force
somebody to
sing? Or is it better to provide a society which cares, which runs on
the
principle of rule of law, which improves the opportunities for the poor?
If
such society is provided, automatically people will feel emotionally
integrated and sing any song happily. I like to end this piece by saying

that we should all recall the life and teachings of the Father of the
Nation
and avoid the trap of increasing Minrority communalism by the majority
adopting communal stand.







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