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Re: Software Quality Example 5



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Please help make the Manifesto better, or accept it, and propagate it!
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I completely agree with the point of view that with the globalisation of
service sector India will be one of the main beneficiary. It is well known
that Indian Brain has been among the best and when it comes to services
major part of it requires use of brain.
A lot of indian tradition has helped in this as well
But one thing which really requires attention is the attitude of our Govt
officials and work culture where we are definitely lacking as compared to
western nations. When i comes to services a time punctuality and quality of
service is required and not just the quantum. A sense of quality is still
lacking in India despite the tallent we have.
There is no reason why we can not compete with others but what really needed
is complete transparancy in all the systems and a change in work culture.
Lets focus on it.


----- Original Message -----
From: Raju Agarwal <krantikari@hotmail.com>
To: <debate@indiapolicy.org>
Sent: Sunday, January 28, 2001 2:52 Prince
Subject: Re: Software Quality Example 5


> ---------------------------------------------------------------------
> Please help make the Manifesto better, or accept it, and propagate it!
> ---------------------------------------------------------------------
> Mr. Arun Mehta,
>
> You seemed to have completely missed the point!
>
> It is not India's "software" turnover that will grow eightfold - it is
> India's "services" exports which will do so, of which software is a
> part.  I
> thought I hade made this clear from the outset, my argument is that
> India
> will be the primary beneficiary from the globalization of the services
> industry in the same way that Japan, the East Asian tiger economies and
> China were the primary beneficiaries of manufacturing.
>
> The past century saw the globalization of manufacturing through advances
> in
> shipping, railroads, expressways, ports, airports, etc.  The next
> century
> (2-3 decades) will see the globalization of services through
> advancements in
> computers and datacommunications.
>
> Hence the "foregone conclusion" that India will surpass China.
>
> While I'm at it let me make a another prediction for you to chew on:
>
> India will be among the first two countries in the world to cross the
> trillion dollar export mark.  (the other contender being the US).
>
> Lastly, with regard to the quality of software professionals - most of
> the
> better companies have extensive in-house training programs.  Infosys
> even
> recruits mechanical and chemical engineers.  All they need to
> demonstrate is
> that they have the aptitude to learn.  In fact it is the strong in-house
>
> training programs that enable Indian software companies to beat the US
> competition by allowing them to quickly adapt to the changing market
> conditions.  As for lack of teaching staff, based on your argument, all
> the
> new IT institutes that are coming up will become "ghost universities",
> right?
>
> >From: Arun Mehta <indata@satyam.net.in>
> >Reply-To: debate@indiapolicy.org
> >To: debate@indiapolicy.org
> >Subject: Re: Software Quality Example 5
> >Date: Sat, 27 Jan 2001 07:45:53 -0800 (PST)
> >
> >---------------------------------------------------------------------
> >Please help make the Manifesto better, or accept it, and propagate it!
> >---------------------------------------------------------------------
> >5 examples you call them? 3 refer to Infosys, 2 to Wipro, according to
> my
> >math, that makes two examples of companies that have been successful in
>
> >exports for a long time, are flush with funds, and can therefore
> compete
> >with the other multinationals in attracting the few good IT
> professionals
> >we produce.
> >
> >I wish you would put out an ad in the paper here, and see the quality
> of
> >people who apply. India's software turnover isn't going to grow 8-fold
> by
> >2008 unless the productivity of its programmers goes up that much (e.g.
>
> >through the production of package software), or the numbers of
> programmers
> >we have goes up 8 fold. We do not have the capacity to produce that
> many
> >quality software professionals. Yes, a large number of institutes are
> >coming up, but we don't have IT teachers to staff them.
> >
> >I get the distinct feeling that I am repeating myself here -- could we
> move
> >on?
> >
> >Arun
>
>
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> This is the National Debate on System Reform.       debate@indiapolicy.org
> Rules, Procedures, Archives:            http://www.indiapolicy.org/debate/
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>



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This is the National Debate on System Reform.       debate@indiapolicy.org
Rules, Procedures, Archives:            http://www.indiapolicy.org/debate/
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