[Date Prev][Date Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next][Date Index][Thread Index]

Re: liberalization - dilution of power



---------------------------------------------------------------------
Please help make the Manifesto better, or accept it, and propagate it!
---------------------------------------------------------------------
  Vamsi Musunuru <vamsi@siliconcorp.com> wrote: 


>What I really meant was that liberalization will shift the power from the
>corrupt and power-hungry to the citizenry

That's a huge leap of faith. We have been liberalizing to some extent for a
decade now, and do we see this transfer of power? No. Things seem to be
getting worse. Look at what happened with the Enron project. It broke all
kinds of laws and norms in the name of 'liberalized investment
environment', and we pay three times for Enron power than NTPC power!! The
basic rights of the citizenry were ignored or squashed. The corrupt had
their power enhanced and the nation/citizenry lost out big time. Before you
write this off as an anecdotal argument, let me tell you that a case can be
made to show this as a trend - if you are interested I can try and dig out
more. The Enron story was easier to point out since Abhay Mehta has written
a book called Power Play.

> and globalization (given a competent
>legislature in India) can also shift the power to India which is now
>concentrated predominantly among industrialized nations.

How so?! The legislatures of Western countries are finding it to uphold
their local laws in the face of WTO rules and regulations. Suppose our
legislature is as competent as or more than those in the industrialized
nations, how's that going to shift the power to India? What gives us the
edge? Capital? we have hardly any compared to the concentrations in the
West. Highly skilled people? They tend to move towards concentrations of
capital. And the countries with Capital allow/invite that movement. But not
low skilled/ unkilled people, however globally competitive their labour is. 

Globalization, as it is carried out now, which facilitates easy flow of hot
money, goods and services but highly restricts the movement of labour, will
put more money and power in the hands of big trans national corporations
and take away control of their own lives from the hands of ordinary
citizens of the world.

We have to deal with the problems within our socio-economic systems
ourselves. Inviting global capital to solve our historical and deep-rooted
problems will only exacerbate matters. Let's not forget how the British
came and "helped us out" when the rajas couldn't get along.

>What is not contemplated here are the benefits of liberalization -
dilution of
>power from the power-hungry Socialists so that every man and woman can own
and
>operate their own enterprise of their own choice. 

Wow! Is that it? Dilute the power of power-hungry Socialists and every
Indian gets to own and run his/her own enterprise?!

><Of course, this is a bit
>difficult understand given one's orientation on individual freedoms.


 The basic foundation of poverty is the lack of freedom, of options. And
this freedom is not going to miraculously appear when the "power-hungry
Socialists" disappear. Remember there are no power-hungry/ful Socialists in
Brazil or Mexico, but only a few people get to own and run whatever they want.

Let me be clear. I am all for true globalization. True globalization is
about humans and their environment. It is not about globalizing the power
of Money. What's going on today is callous expoitation of gross disparities
by sections of people who had  historic advantage, using the facade of
globalization. It is about dumping toxic waste in the frontyards of the
poor and manipulating the prices of commodities and currencies of the poor.
It is about valueing a life in Africa close to nothing compared to a life
in the West. One could say that this is a natural tendency and nothing
wrong about it; but then one should acknowledge that this will be reflected
in the economic transactions also. And many of us who talk of the poor also
have internalized this. There are people who argue that the $450mi
compensation for Bhopal is more than enough since the 'economic level' of
India is low even when they are told that Exxon had to pay $2bi for a
relatively innocuous oil spill.

Yes, you are right. "One's orientation on individual freedoms" is very
important in enabling comprehension. However it is as important to realize
that the social conditions in which people find themselves define the
boundaries of their freedom. 

Tejus



---------------------------------
Do You Yahoo!?
Send instant messages with Yahoo! Messenger.
--0-596516649-961639238=:18954
Content-Type: text/html; charset=us-ascii

<P> <BR>
<P>&nbsp; <B><I>Vamsi Musunuru &lt;vamsi@siliconcorp.com&gt;</I></B> wrote:
<BR>
<BLOCKQUOTE style="BORDER-LEFT: #1010ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px;
PADDING-LEFT: 5px">
<P><BR>&gt;What I really meant was that liberalization will shift the power
from the<BR>&gt;corrupt and power-hungry to the citizenry</P>
<P>That's a huge leap of faith. We have been liberalizing to some extent
for a decade now, and do we see this transfer of power? No. Things seem to
be getting worse. Look at what happened with the Enron project. It broke
all kinds of laws and norms in the name of 'liberalized investment
environment', and we pay three times for Enron power than NTPC power!! The
basic rights of the citizenry were ignored or squashed. The corrupt had
their power enhanced and the nation/citizenry lost out big time. Before you
write this off as an anecdotal argument, let me tell you that a case can be
made to show this as a trend - if you are interested I can try and dig out
more. The Enron story was easier to point out since Abhay Mehta has written
a book called Power Play.</P>
<P>&gt;&nbsp;and globalization (given a competent<BR>&gt;legislature in
India) can also shift the power to India which is now<BR>&gt;concentrated
predominantly among industrialized nations.</P>
<P>How so?! The legislatures of Western countries are finding it to uphold
their local laws in the face of WTO rules and regulations. Suppose our
legislature is as competent as or more than those in the industrialized
nations, how's that going to shift the power to India? What gives us the
edge? Capital? we have hardly any compared to the concentrations in the
West. Highly skilled people? They tend to move towards concentrations of
capital. And the countries with Capital allow/invite that movement. But not
low skilled/ unkilled people, however globally competitive their labour is.
</P>
<P>Globalization, as it is carried out now, which facilitates easy flow of
hot money, goods and services but highly restricts the movement of labour,
will put more money and power in the hands of big trans national
corporations and take away control of their own lives&nbsp;from the hands
of ordinary citizens of the world.</P>
<P>We have to deal with the problems within our socio-economic systems
ourselves. Inviting global capital to solve our historical and deep-rooted
problems will only exacerbate matters. Let's not forget how the British
came and "helped us out" when the rajas couldn't get along.</P>
<P>&gt;What is not contemplated here are the benefits of liberalization -
dilution of<BR>&gt;power from the power-hungry Socialists so that every man
and woman can own and<BR>&gt;operate their own enterprise of their own
choice. </P>
<P>Wow! Is that it? Dilute the power of power-hungry Socialists and every
Indian gets to own and run&nbsp;his/her own enterprise?!</P>
<P>&gt;&lt;Of course, this is a bit<BR>&gt;difficult understand given one's
orientation on individual freedoms.<BR></P>
<P>&nbsp;The basic foundation of poverty is the lack of freedom, of
options. And this freedom is not going to miraculously appear when the
"power-hungry Socialists" disappear. Remember there are no power-hungry/ful
Socialists in Brazil or Mexico, but only a few people get to own and run
whatever they want.</P>
<P>Let me be clear. I am all for true globalization. True globalization is
about humans and their environment. It is not about globalizing the power
of Money. What's going on today is callous expoitation of gross disparities
by sections of people who had&nbsp; historic advantage, using the facade of
globalization. It is about dumping toxic waste in the frontyards of the
poor and manipulating the prices of commodities and currencies of the poor.
It is about valueing a life in Africa close to nothing compared to a life
in the West. One could say that this is a natural tendency and nothing
wrong about it; but then one should acknowledge that this will be reflected
in the economic transactions also. And many of us who talk of the poor also
have internalized this. There are people who argue that the $450mi
compensation for Bhopal is more than enough since the 'economic level' of
India is low even when they are told that Exxon had to pay $2bi for a
relatively innocuous oil spill.</P>
<P>Yes, you are right. "One's orientation on individual freedoms" is very
important in enabling comprehension. However it is as important to realize
that the social conditions in which people find themselves define the
boundaries of their freedom. </P>
<P>Tejus</P></BLOCKQUOTE><p><br><hr size=1><b>Do You Yahoo!?</b><br>
Send instant messages with <a href="http://im.yahoo.com/">Yahoo!
Messenger</a>.
--0-596516649-961639238=:18954--


--------------------------------------------------------------------------
This is the National Debate on System Reform.       debate@indiapolicy.org
Rules, Procedures, Archives:            http://www.indiapolicy.org/debate/
-------------------------------------------------------------------------