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Re: Recruitment in IT...



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     I am sorry to have irritated you.  But the question was a different 
     one:  is it really the case that all the so-called training that is 
     given to people between the ages of say 14 and 21 is in fact needed?  
     Might it be the case that some of it is merely theoretically useful 
     but not in fact practically useful?  Are we depriving ourselves of 
     much useful human talent at a key point in their lives (when they 
     could also be earning money) while also wasting a lot of our national 
     investment in people?  
     
     I was not asking whether formal training is needed in this or any 
     other field.  I was asking whether the so-called formal training is 
     the most appropriate given the purpose.
     
     In my view, the reason why companies (in the West, anyway) wait for 
     "trained" people is that they have no mechanisms to do the sifting 
     required and let the universities do the sifting instead.  
     
     They then take these so-called "trained" people and put them through 
     the specific training required to make them useful to the company 
     concerned.  
     
     In fact, companies are quite concerned and have made considerable 
     noise about how irrelevant some of the training is and how much it 
     leaves to be desired. 
     
     There is another factor: if companies were to take people directly 
     from school (as they do in northern European countries but not 
     elsewhere in the West as far as I know), they make a considerable 
     investment in them (more than they do in the training of the 
     individuals they buy from the marketplace later on) and they are not 
     sure whether in today's "open" marketplace the people trained by the 
     company will in fact stay with them and thus the investment will be 
     lost.  On this basis, many northern European company have started 
     reducing their investment in this "apprenticeship" model.  However, 
     all the evidence I can find so far (only anecdotal, I'm afraid) 

     suggests that people trained through the apprenticeship schemes are 
     likely to be more loyal to the company than those "bought" in the open 
     market later.  Further, I am yet to be shown any figures and 
     calculations which demonstrate that the cost of investing in an 
     apprenticeship is more than the cost of buying an individual in the 
     marketplace later....

Prabhu Guptara

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Subject: Re: Recruitment in  IT...
Author:  sikhipi (sikhipi@yahoo.com) at unix,mime
Date:    26.01.2000 06:14


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--- prabhu.guptara@ubs.com wrote:
>      Is there in fact any evidence that school 
> graduates make any less 
>      effective software programmers than graduates?
     
Is there any evidence that school graduates make 
any less effective economists than, say, graduates 
of Delhi School of Economics?
     
>      
>      might it be the case that talented people with 
> LESS than a school 
>      graduation could make equally good programmers?
     
Might it be the case that talented people with LESS 
than a school graduation could make equally good 
economists, historians, microbiologists, anthropolo- 
gists, journalists and whatever?
     
Excuse me for being rhetorical, but I find annoying 
the imputation that the people needed to build 
software
are somehow less in need of (formal) training than 
those pursuing other productive activities.
     
Oh yes, "talented" people with unrelated (or no 
formal)
qualifications can and do program to the satisfaction 
of commercial enterprise, but recruiters prefer to 
hire people with professional degrees in Computer 
Science for the same reason that businesses hire 
MBA's: 
some modicum of a guarantee that the person has been 
imparted skills relevant to the application domain. 
Employers are just being sensible; I fail to see how 
their policy amounts to "discrimination". 
     
Sikhivahan
     
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This is the National Debate on System Reform.       debate@indiapolicy.org
Rules, Procedures, Archives:            http://www.indiapolicy.org/debate/
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