[Date Prev][Date Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next][Date Index][Thread Index]

RE: Completely misguided arguments on compulsory education



---------------------------------------------------------------------
Please help make the Manifesto better, or accept it, and propagate it!
---------------------------------------------------------------------
This is my first intervention in this debate so I apologise if the etiquette
is not right.I also hesitate because I realise that time does not always
permit us to begin dialogues and answer counters as much as we would desire
to do so.

I am appalled that policy level people continue to think that education
should not be compulsory. Show me a developed country which does not have
compulsory education. Myron Wiener once told me that if he were advisor to
the greatest enemy of India and he was asked what he would advise as the
policy likely to weaken the country and keep it where it is today he would
say "Adopt the policy that India has at present towards education."

At a seminar in Harvard on the subject a colleague of mine Dr Vasudha
Dhagamwar was told that making education compulsory took away the freedom of
choice from a child and therefore it was somehow undemocratic to suggest
that there be an element of compulsion in education. This is sheer sophistry
from people who have all the benefits of education and who were never given
any choice about whether they wanted to be educated and who would not dream
of giving their own children the choice of saying no to being educated.

The debate about making education compulsory and enforcing that rigorously
should be separated from issues such as what should be taught; how should it
be taught etc. That can come later. First we need an unequivocal policy that
indicates that there is the political will to enforce compulsory education.

We know there is money available, if it is not budgets must be reallocated
so that education is a primary expenditure and can be compulsory. We know
that both central and state administrations have the administrative
capability and the legal clout to make large universal and country wide
schemes succeed. We have only to look at the regular enterprise of
administering  elections and country wide immunisation programs to  know
that when the political elite require it things do move just as they should
no matter what the scale or cost.

I will not here reiterate the arguments in favour of compulsory education,
or the connections between child labour, suppressed wage rates, the economic
compulsions of the poor to have more children and send them early to work
and the perpetuation of poverty and class structures, with education. They
are all too well known. However I cannot resist saying that it is the
closest I come to condemning our society in general as being immoral is when
I hear people say that education should not be compulsory.

I believe that it should be free ( for the most part) and compulsory for
all.

> -----Original Message-----
> From: owner-india_policy@cinenet.net
> [mailto:owner-india_policy@cinenet.net]On Behalf Of Komaragiri,
> Parameswer R (Parameswer)** CTR **
> Sent: 06 January 2000 20:13
> To: debate@indiapolicy.org
> Subject: RE: Completely misguided arguments on compulsory education
>
>
> ---------------------------------------------------------------------
> Please help make the Manifesto better, or accept it, and propagate it!
> ---------------------------------------------------------------------
> Date: Wed, 22 Dec 1999 10:41:05 -0500
>
> Compulsory Education is the only secular means in India to control
> population:
>
> Thailand statistics might me true but Just like family Planning,
> Drugs' ban,
> and banning somany illegitimate things,
> it could be appropriate for State to  constrain freedome of parents in not
> sending to school and opting to extract work from them for daily bread.
> Probably this may deter poor parents from producing more number
> of children
> as they are now aware that kids can no more be sent for work to earn for
> them, and the measure will work as a strong factor in motivating them for
> family planning.
>
> This is because with the complex religeous matrix we have, we can
> not adopt
> a stringent Chinese sysrtem of taking punitive actions against
> parents. Even that has it's own adverse  results in the form of secret
> infanticides..
>
> Most civilised, indirect control on population growth would be to make
> education compulsory, hold parents liable.. etc.
> This will be immune from any religeous sentiments because the law doesnot
> prohibit producing more children which might be objectionable to some
> relegions! But pressure of subsistance economy would force them
> to plan in a
> scientific , secular way and do family planning all by  them selves!.This
> compulsion would soon see more schools, and would also see absence of any
> need for Govt Propaganda, or depending on agencies like Lions clubs to hit
> District targets of Family Planning statistics .
>
> Parameswer
>
> > ----------
> > From: Dr. Sanjeev Sabhlok[SMTP:sanjeev@sabhlokcity.com]
> > Reply To: debate@indiapolicy.org
> > Sent: Wednesday, December 22, 1999 10:07 AM
> > To: debate@indiapolicy.org
> > Subject: Completely misguided arguments on compulsory education
> >
> > ---------------------------------------------------------------------
> > Please help make the Manifesto better, or accept it, and propagate it!
> > ---------------------------------------------------------------------
> > Just wanted to re-iterate that making education compulsory is a most
> > futile
> > effort. It was recently argued in a newspaper (I forget which) that in
> > Thailand, compulsory education was the cause of the rise in
> education. The
> > reality is that these folks do not know their basic info. Between
> > 1935-1960, 4 years of education was compulsory in Thailand; from 1978, 6
> > years became compulsory. Statistical data on Thailand (which is in my
> > dissertation and can be obtained from anywhere) shows that
> compulsion was
> > entirely ineffective in motivating education till economic
> policies became
> > 'right' in early 70s. I have argued in a footnote in my
> dissertation that
> > 'compulsion' does not translate into actual education. In
> Thailand, given
> > that growth has been rapid, the opportunity set of the children is
> > perceived to be increasing, and investment in education of children
> > considered worthwhile.Parental choice is crucial at each stage. Parents
> > are
> > not morons as most of us like to think villagers are.
> >
> > Was reading P.Sainath's "Everybody loves a good drought," - superb book.
> > Only, Sainath's conclusions from his studies in villages are completely
> > unthought and plainly wrong, in most cases. I wish I could type
> out pages
> > 45-67: after showing why government has completely failed and parents
> > don't
> > send children to school, he argues that education must be made
> > compulsory!!!
> >
> >
> >
> >
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------
> > This is the National Debate on System Reform.
> debate@indiapolicy.org
> > Rules, Procedures, Archives:
> http://www.indiapolicy.org/debate/
> >
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
> >
>
>
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------
> This is the National Debate on System Reform.       debate@indiapolicy.org
> Rules, Procedures, Archives:            http://www.indiapolicy.org/debate/
> -------------------------------------------------------------------------
>


--------------------------------------------------------------------------
This is the National Debate on System Reform.       debate@indiapolicy.org
Rules, Procedures, Archives:            http://www.indiapolicy.org/debate/
-------------------------------------------------------------------------