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Re: Some American views on nuclearization



I do see a lot of America hating, Pakistan hating etc as  motivation as well
as topic within our discussion. Can we all be  a little more objective and
look each of them as a different socio-politico-economic (Geez !) models.

Despite their hidden objectives, America has some of the ingredients of
economic model that many nations are trying to acheive ( many of us on this
discussion seem to been in America - the land of OPPOTUNITIES!) .

Whatever are our views on the nuke bomb which India has tested, shouldn't we
be a bit more like the Chinese- keep quiet and go ahead with the task at
hand, be it repairing the economy or testing bombs?

Antony







-----Original Message-----
From: Charudatt <charu@iced.com>
To: india_policy@cinenet.net <india_policy@cinenet.net>
Date: Thursday, May 21, 1998 10:25 PM
Subject: RE: Some American views on nuclearization


>I don't understand the point of reviewing or discussing the propaganda
>of a right wing think tank like the heritage foundation. The only useful
>conclusion I can draw from reading this stuff I already know: that there
>are ideologues promoting militarization, and whipping up fear and
>hysteria against imaginary "enemies" and "rogue states" [though with a
>little reflection it is easy to figure out the identity of the worlds
>biggest rogue state ;)]. This is not new or unique, for example,
>Pakistani politicians regularly invoke the bogey of an Indian "threat"
>as a way of distracting attention from domestic problems as do many
>Indian politicians and I see the recent nuclear tests as a manifestation
>of this.
>
>Back to the heritage foundation. Who benefits from their propaganda and
>flak? My take on this is that they are funded by interests of the very
>rich minority of this country that controls most of the wealth [I think
>the numbers are: 2% of the population owning 80% of the wealth, 10% own
>95%]. During WW2, the US became a command economy, resulting in
>guaranteed high corporate profits to industry. With the end of the war,
>the cold war was invented as a way of continuing this situation without
>the presence of an actual shooting war. Now with the end of the cold
>war,  a new reason for channeling public funds [$300 billion/yr] into
>corporate boondoggles has to be invented. The papers listed here is a
>sampling of the effort in that direction.
>
>-Charu
>
> ----------
> From:  Sanjeev Sabhlok[SMTP:sabhlok@almaak.usc.edu]
> Sent:  Thursday, May 21, 1998 1:23 AM
> To:  india_policy@cinenet.net
> Subject:  Some American views on nuclearization
>
> Recent papers on India's nuclear tests by Heritage foundation.
>
>
>http://www.heritage.org/heritage/library/backgrounder/bg1183es.html
>
> > o India's Nuclear Blasts: A Reminder of America's
>Vulnerability
> >   by Richard D. Fisher
> >   http://www.heritage.org/heritage/library/execmemo/em527.html
> >
> > o Why America Still Needs Ballistic Missile Defense
> >   by The Honorable Don Nickles
> >   http://www.heritage.org/heritage/library/lecture/hl612.html
> >
> > o Flouting the Constitution: Clinton's New ABM Treaty Lacks
> >   Senate Consent by Thomas Moore
> >
>http://www.heritage.org/heritage/library/backgrounder/bg1174.html
> >
> > o The ABM Treaty--Not Political Pressure--Causes Risk in
> >   Ballistic Missile Defense by Baker Spring
> >   http://www.heritage.org/heritage/library/execmemo/em521.html
>
> >
> > o 15 Years and Counting: Why Americans Still Are Vulnerable to
> >   Missile Attack by Thomas Moore
> >
>http://www.heritage.org/heritage/library/backgrounder/bg1166es.html
> >
>